The Centre for Solution Focused Practice

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The four foundations of therapeutic minimalism.

Evan has just returned from Finland where Ben Furman invited him to share his thinking on therapeutic minimalism. It was a great 2 days and during the course of those two days he learned a great deal about what he thinks about the Secrets of Minimalism. Here Evan sets out four foundational ideas without which minimalism is impossible.

Relationally undemanding.

There is a sort of logical error that must have a name. It is when we apply the requirements or characteristics of one thing to another thing as if the two things are of the same kind – just that they are not. Evan George discusses one of these logical errors relating to our field of Solution Focused Brief Therapy.

BRIEF Solution Focused Training in Wales October 18 - April 19

BRIEF will be offering four 2-day SF training modules in Wales, in Cardiff, between October 2018 and April 2019. This marks the enormous growth in interest in Solution Focus throughout Wales in both children, family and adult services, in which BRIEF has been delighted (and proud) to have played a part.

How can we think about the client’s ‘best hopes’?

There are things that continue to puzzle me about the Solution Focused approach – not just interest me but really puzzle me. And the main one that I find myself thinking about over and over is to do with the client’s response to the ‘best hopes’ question. How should we think about the client’s response, what name should we give it, and how should the client’s answer be connected to the rest of the work? Evan George shares some very provisional thoughts.

‘How does that make you feel?’

Well how does that question - ‘how does that make you feel’ - make you feel? In my case the answer is a bit queasy, indeed slightly nauseous, which in many ways is unfortunate since it appears to be the go-to, the stock question that so many practitioners rely upon when they are not quite sure what else to ask. Evan George explores the difficulties with this question.

‘I know I can do it’.

A DBIT (Essex) practitioner new to Solution Focused Practice describes her experience of using the approach with a 15 year old girl who is 'an anxious school refuser'. The practitioner describes herself feeling 'overwhelmed' by what the young person was able to achieve.

Integrating SF . . . or not.

One of the most frequent questions that gets asked on training programmes is the question ‘can you integrate SF with other approach?’ And very often this question is asked from a stance which implies that the worker drawing on a range of approaches is clearly and obviously beneficial to the client. However in SF the answer to this question seems to be neither quite so clear nor quite so obvious.

Evan George shares his thoughts.

10 ideas for times when the ‘best hopes’ are not forthcoming.

Towards the end of a recent training programme one of the participants asked a question about ‘best hopes’ – well more specifically what to do if the client doesn’t answer the ‘best hopes’ question. The particular context involved meeting a 14-year-old boy who had been ‘sent’ to meet with her and who, despite the worker’s best efforts had still not described his ‘best hopes’ by the end of the first meeting. As a group we began to generate ideas about what can be useful in such circumstances although it is only fair to the worker to say that she had tried pretty well everything that we discussed.